Category Archives: Real Story

To the Skin Deep community…

A message from Lauren

Things have been a little quiet here over the last few months, so I wanted to provide an explanation.

Jane, Jess and Natalie on a body image panel at Women of the World Festival 2013

Jess (centre) with Jane and Natalie on a body image panel at Women of the World Festival (Katherine) 2013

We’ve had some changes to the team and a HUGE thank you goes out to Jess who recently moved on to channel her great energy into other areas. Jess has been a huge influence in the every day activities of the project, a great support, and is going to kill it at whatever she puts her mind to!

In other areas: yesterday I watched this talk by the brilliant Brené Brown (a US researcher) and, like a few other things over this period, it really struck a chord with me. I’ve been living small. I have been stuck in a giant, fiery hole of self doubt and it’s been creating blockages in many areas of my life from this project (which I am intensely passionate about), to my new business, and even to just being motivated to get up and go for a walk.

IT SUCKS.

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After cancer

By Kate Bickford – originally shared internally with ABC employees.
Kate Bickford went to hell and back when she was diagnosed with a rare form of cervical cancer. But the experience has galvanised her to help others, with a trip to Bhutan the next step in her journey. Why Skin Deep? A number of levels for us. You can’t necessarily judge a person’s health just by looking at them, nor do we always know the stories behind those we encounter each day. On another level, it’s also important that we take steps to look after the different aspects of our health and be thankful for each day.
KateTo look at me you wouldn’t know I’ve been battling cancer. You probably wouldn’t know that I take seven medications daily.
I still see doctors most weeks and I’m fighting back waves of nauseas and other side effects of the medication I take.
To look at me you wouldn’t know that my doctors have told me that if I had left my pap test for another 3 – 5 years my treatment would be very different: they would not be curing my cancer, they would only be prolonging my life.

Having a routine pap test saved my life.

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Turnings on Edges

By Alysha Herrmann

Last month I said I’d talk about the ‘turning point’ for me in learning to love and accept my body. But I actually told a bit of a fib. That’s not *exactly* what I’m going to share. I can’t talk about the turning point, because I didn’t win the war with my body.

My body is not a static, unchanging experience.

My body has grown two children. It has fluctuated in dress size, in fitness, in muscle tone, in appearance. I have new scars, freckles and moles. My dress sense has changed as my life (and confidence) has changed. My hair colour and style is an ongoing party.

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Fatty Number Two

Words: Alysha Herrmann

 

My body did nothing to you.

 

Does anyone else remember being weighed in PE class at school? Do they still do that?

 

I’m not sure, but I think this is where one of my high school nicknames began.

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Struggles of a skinny girl

Words: Lindsey Diacogiannis

 

“What’s anorexic?” I asked my friends after they jeeringly told me I looked that way, at the age of thirteen. I weighed about xx (number removed by Skin Deep Project to comply with Mind Frame national media standards), had always been thin and never had an eating disorder. I’d been fortunate enough not to have faced eating disorders, but when I was told I “looked anorexic” it was the tone of voice that implied something was ‘wrong’ with the way I looked.

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For the Mother I Sometimes Meet

Words: Alysha Herrmann

As long as I can remember, my mother has always been overweight. Hovering usually in an Australian dress size of 22-26, she’s had to shop at plus size stores or generic department stores with their shapeless, blocky and unflattering designs. And it was always clear, without always being spoken, that she hated her body and by extension often herself.  There were many times she’d ask  ‘How can you love me, when I’m so fat and ugly?’ or “Do you think I’m ugly?’ or just state ‘I look horrible. Horrible and fat.’ Questions and statements that came from a deep and hurting place inside of her.

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How speaking up has helped me quiet the noise.

Words: Rachel Warland 

I was inspired to write this following the tragic passing of Charlotte Dawson and the need to get out there the importance of treating and educating people about mental illness.

About a year ago some alarm bells set off for me after completing a Mental Health First Aid course and I decided it was time for me to get help. A year later (almost) and I am a lot better and manage my anxiety as best I can. Receiving ongoing treatment was the best thing I ever did – it has done wonders in aiding me to live with anxiety. I want to share my experiences to help others who suffer from mental illness and give them hope that things will get better if you find that light within, or confide in those you love wanting to help you. And get the help you need and deserve.

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